Home » Boat of the Week: This 171-Foot Hybrid Superyacht Has Not One But Two Mosaic Plunge Pools

Boat of the Week: This 171-Foot Hybrid Superyacht Has Not One But Two Mosaic Plunge Pools

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The first hull in Baglietto’s 171-foot T52 displacement series is also the line’s first hybrid yacht. Owned by a serial boater who appreciates the simple life, the design mates a chic, paired-back interior with three galleys, two pools, and one of the largest top-deck terraces on any yacht of its size. It also allows for emissions-free sailing at the switch of a button from its integrated bridge.

Robb Report toured the new build at Baglietto’s shipyard in La Spezia, Italy. It’s the owner’s third and largest Baglietto to date. The extra interior volume of this displacement yacht—compared to the owner’s previous two semi-planing hulls—has allowed for custom requests that support his lifestyle preferences.

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

The interior is informal, using just one wood type, per the owner’s request.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi

The most surprising layout change is the relocation of the lower deck crew mess to the heart of the main deck, next to an enlarged open galley. “The owner loves to cook, and dining with his crew who have been with him for over 20 years is a happy and regular occurrence,” Fabio Ermetto, Baglietto’s chief commercial officer, tells Robb Report during a tour of the yacht. “But he simply can’t and won’t cook on induction hobs.” Installing gas cookers required specialist safety equipment but fulfilled just one of the owner’s many custom requests.

The second galley is in the upper deck sky lounge—“for when the owner wants to whip up a quick pasta”—and the third on the sun deck with a fridge, dumbwaiter and pop-up TV.

Stepping on board the 1,400-square-foot sun deck—Baglietto claims it’s the largest on a 171-foot yacht—reveals an open-plan terrace shaded by a partial hardtop.

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

This mosaic plunge pool is one of two aboard. The second on the main deck has a lifting floor that turns it into a social area.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi

Oversized sunpads aft are matched with lounges forward and a mosaic plunge pool flanked by two showers. It’s a long sweeping area that connects to the 540-square-foot foredeck via a retractable staircase—a first for Baglietto. It creates an impressive area for socializing, where large lounges, coffee tables, and more sunpads create an extended hub for the family to spend time together.

A second pool with a lifting floor is on the main deck aft. It’s part of the three-tiered open stern with steps down to a beach club and a drop-down swim platform. The idea was to have one very long deck with an infinity pool to draw the eye out to sea,” says Ermetto. Tender garages forward and aft keep the decks free for guest use. Separate stairs for crew and guests keep service areas clear.

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

The owner’s residential ensuite.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi

The “T” in T52 is code for modern reinterpretation of Baglietto’s classic steel displacement yachts that fall under 500 GT. The letter T stands for “Traditional,” which Baglietto chose because it has all the hallmarks of yachts designed by Francesco Paskowski, credited with bringing the brand back to life. Paszkowski also penned the interiors with Margherita Casprini.

Paszkowski describes the interior as “sober and contemporary,” largely thanks to the owner’s request for a single type of wood and stone. His favorite wood is teak, used for the decking, walls, and joinery. A natural white composite stone with a matte finish is used across the cocktail bars, dining tables, and floors—inside and out—and was selected for its durability and stain resistance.

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

The fold-down transom opens up the cockpit.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi

Small supporting elements include lacquered surfaces, oak flooring, natural almond-shaded leather, and Botticino marble in the guest en suites and day heads. Burnished metal and satin-finished stainless-steel details are rounded off with loose furniture by Fendi Casa, Dedon, and Tribù.

“The T52 offers extremely comfortable exteriors and truly impressive volumes, allowing [the owner] to enjoy life in the open air to the fullest,” says Paszkowski.

That open-air lifestyle includes the upper-deck salon, where floor-to-ceiling windows open on three sides to create an alfresco lounge, with a table for 10 guests. The effect is reinforced with glass balustrades and no handrails. Twelve guests are accommodated in five cabins, including a full-beam master with a full-sized bathtub.

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

The yacht was designed with multiple social areas.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi

The owner can also look forward to silent electric cruising in waters where diesel-powered vessels are prohibited, such as wildlife refuges and marine sanctuaries. Baglietto’s diesel electric propulsion package delivers six hours of cruising on batteries at around six knots and 10 hours at anchor running the hotel load. The four different cruising modes are controlled at the flick of a switch via the large integrated bridge.

“With the generators switched on, the batteries charge while cruising to give long-range autonomy and a 7,600 nautical mile range,” Alessandro Balzi, Baglietto’s fleet project manager, tells Robb Report. “With the generators off in electric mode, the yacht generates power on the drive shaft, which is very good for long voyages and ocean passages.”

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

This view gives a sense of the open exterior.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi

Two MTU 16V2000M86 engines give a top speed of 17 knots and a range of 3,600 nautical miles. Eight more T52s are currently under construction, with delivery dates scheduled between 2024 and 2026.

Click here for more images of Baglietto’s T52.

The new Baglietto T52 is the first of the 171-foot series.

Courtesy Maurizio Paradisi



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